Most adults today can recall countless hours spent growing up with pencil in hand perfecting every letter in the cursive alphabet, or pulling out a sheet of notebook paper to get started on a class essay. Now, in the 21st-century classroom, typing is the preferred method of communication for practically any task or assignment. Of course, we can all agree that typing is more time-efficient and less physically taxing, but learning how to handwrite is still essential for today’s students.

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As paper submissions slowly disappear in lieu of digital submissions, and cursive slowly gets replaced by Microsoft Word or Google Docs, there exists a fear that eventually learning how to write will go completely extinct in our education system. While technology is a great supplementary tool in education, handwriting is still applicable to so many life skills like:


Motor Skills Development.

Handwriting develops motor skills by teaching children how to locate each stroke relative to other strokes, learn and remember appropriate size and details of strokes, and develop muscle memory.

Memory Recall.

Writing—for example, in note-taking—has been proven to provide improved memory recall, an essential skill throughout all levels of education.

Reading Comprehension.

Writing and reading are strongly connected, as strong writing skills have been shown to increase reading comprehension. This union will help students in the long run by giving them a competitive advantage in both standardized testing and reading for higher education.

Legal Documents.

Documents like a driver’s license application, a court-mandated form – or even a simple rent check – still and likely always will need to be completed by hand for legal purposes.

Creativity.

Writing words in different styles, such as calligraphy, stimulates the creative part of the brain—something that cannot be mimicked by selecting a new font from the ‘toolbar.’


While technology is a vital resource in education by providing new opportunities in personalized learning and enhancing critical thinking skills, handwriting is still a modern necessity. So, as technology continues to advance education, the practice of handwriting shouldn’t be forgotten. We understand the importance of handwriting at Thrively, so we created a course specifically for note-taking! “Cornell Note Taking” teaches students how to most effectively take handwritten notes. This form of note-taking leads to improved memory retention and emphasizes topic comprehension—results we can’t write off!